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recycling bins

Recycling & Waste Reduction

Recycling

One of the first steps in creating a sustainable environment is to RECYCLE. Know what your office, dormitory, institution or community accepts for recycling, how they want it collected (segregated or co-mingled) and how often they remove recycled materials from your area. Communicate the recycling information to co-workers, residents and new community members so they can participate in the program as well.

Here are a few helpful tips for organizing recycling in your area:

  • Communicate what can be recycled by hanging posters or signs
  • Indicate which materials go into which bins with concise labels
  • Have the appropriate number of collection bins for your area
  • Place recycling bins next to trash cans

Visit the MIT Department of Facilities website for specific information on MIT’s recycling program.

Check out the MIT Working Green Committee website for more recycling details and ideas on how to live and work green at MIT and beyond.

Waste Reduction

MIT’s Working Group Recycling (WGR), in collaboration with the Environment, Health & Safety Office, Sustainability Program and Department of Facilities, has developed a lot of great resources on how to be more sustainable in your daily lives at MIT and beyond. Some of the information you may find helpful includes:

  • How to remove yourself from junk mail lists
  • Where to buy recycled content items for the office, the lab, or around the house
  • What to do with your extra packing peanuts and shipping materials
  • The art of composting
  • How to Print Smarter – double-sided, recycled content, etc.

If you’re looking for additional resources for sustainable living & working, visit the Working Green which is home to the Green Ambassador Program and other great information about MIT’s Campus Sustainability activities.

Recycling

One of the first steps in creating a sustainable environment is to RECYCLE. Know what your office, dormitory, institution or community accepts for recycling, how they want it collected (segregated or co-mingled) and how often they remove recycled materials from your area. Communicate the recycling information to co-workers, residents and new community members so they can participate in the program as well.

Here are a few helpful tips for organizing recycling in your area:

  • Communicate what can be recycled by hanging posters or signs
  • Indicate which materials go into which bins with concise labels
  • Have the appropriate number of collection bins for your area
  • Place recycling bins next to trash cans

Visit the MIT Department of Facilities website for specific information on MIT’s recycling program.

Check out the MIT Working Green Committee website for more recycling details and ideas on how to live and work green at MIT and beyond.

Waste Reduction

MIT’s Working Group Recycling (WGR), in collaboration with the Environment, Health & Safety Office, Sustainability Program and Department of Facilities, has developed a lot of great resources on how to be more sustainable in your daily lives at MIT and beyond. Some of the information you may find helpful includes:

  • How to remove yourself from junk mail lists
  • Where to buy recycled content items for the office, the lab, or around the house
  • What to do with your extra packing peanuts and shipping materials
  • The art of composting
  • How to Print Smarter – double-sided, recycled content, etc.

If you’re looking for additional resources for sustainable living & working, visit the Working Green which is home to the Green Ambassador Program and other great information about MIT’s Campus Sustainability activities.