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Autoclave Validation Program

At MIT, autoclaves are used to sterilize waste and clean materials associated with biomedical research. The Autoclave Validation Program oversees compliance of biohazardous waste management at the state level (Massachusetts State Sanitary Code Chapter VIII 105 CMR 480.000) and assists in maintaining the institute’s international accreditation with AAALAC (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care). The program is managed by the EHS Biosafety Program with local coordination and operational collaboration across the MIT campus campus.

The MIT Autoclave Validation Program performs challenge testing on all autoclaves used within MIT research facilities. Validation tests are performed with a small self-contained biological indicator containing a standard challenge population of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores, a non-pathogenic thermophilic bacterium that are naturally resistant to high heat and pressure. Inactiviation of G. stearothermophilus spores can be achieved with a 16 minute exposure to typical autoclave conditions of 121°C and 15psi and as a result these spores are an ideal biological indicator of microbe viability after autoclave sterilization.

At MIT, autoclaves are used to sterilize waste and clean materials associated with biomedical research. The Autoclave Validation Program oversees compliance of biohazardous waste management at the state level (Massachusetts State Sanitary Code Chapter VIII 105 CMR 480.000) and assists in maintaining the institute’s international accreditation with AAALAC (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care). The program is managed by the EHS Biosafety Program with local coordination and operational collaboration across the MIT campus campus.

The MIT Autoclave Validation Program performs challenge testing on all autoclaves used within MIT research facilities. Validation tests are performed with a small self-contained biological indicator containing a standard challenge population of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores, a non-pathogenic thermophilic bacterium that are naturally resistant to high heat and pressure. Inactiviation of G. stearothermophilus spores can be achieved with a 16 minute exposure to typical autoclave conditions of 121°C and 15psi and as a result these spores are an ideal biological indicator of microbe viability after autoclave sterilization.