Animal/Mouse Bite

Updated July 15, 2015

Incident or near miss –

On May 21, 2015 a research assistant was restraining a mouse for the purpose of subcutaneously injecting a medication. They were wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), including gloves on both hands. However, one particular mouse turned its head during the restraint and bit the middle finger of his left hand.

 

Response action – They immediately changed gloves and applied Povidone-Iodine to the area.  The researcher noticed redness in the bite area so they followed up with MIT Medical the next day on May 22nd.   They also reported the incident to their PI who filed an incident report.

 

Immediate Cause – contributing cause(s) - Mouse turned its head during the restraint and bit the middle finger of his left hand.

 

Causal factors (confirmed or suspected) – Researcher suspects that it is due to the animal being under stress due to multiple injections every 6-12 hours.

 

Recommended corrective action(s) or lessons learned – (a) Creating a more firm restraint on the animals while performing injections. (b) Also, minimizing the duration of the restraint to cut down on the stress experienced by the animal, and thereby help them cooperate better.

 

What worked well – (a) Wearing appropriate PPE, including lab coat and gloves, while handling the animal.  Although the mouse bit my finger, there was no break in the skin and no blood.

(b) Applying Povidone-iodine solution to the area right after the incident.

 

Biosafety Questions:

  1. Was the injured party exposed to a biological material? No

 

  1. Was the injured party exposed to recombinant DNA or synthetic nucleic acids? No